Seeds for Success

Stink-Bug-Damage-Seedling-CornVarious species of stink bugs cause a range of crop damage. In soybeans, they typically do not produce damage enough to warrant treatment while soybeans are in the early reproductive stages. In corn, many growers have seen stunted and tillered corn along field edges that may be the result of stink bug feeding early in the season as shown in the photo.

Currently, trap counts indicate building populations of several stink bug species. Growers are encouraged to continue to carefully monitor stink bug presence and populations.

Green stink bugs and Southern green stink bugs are often treated with pyrethroid insecticides. Red banded stinkbugs are more difficult to control as treatment with pyrethroid insecticides typically may suppress populations, but not adequately control them.

Talk with your AgVenture Yield Specialist about stink bug management options.

(photo: Mississippi State University)

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